Keg Size Comparison Chart

Comparing Keg Sizes & Types:

Here’s a chart that compares eight common types of kegs, including how much beer they hold, their overall size and most common uses for each.

Mini Keg Cornelius Keg Sixth Barrel Quarter Barrel Slim Quarter Half Barrel Rubber Barrel Beveled barrel
Also Called Bubba Corny Keg; Homebrew Keg Sixtel; Log Pony Keg; Stubby Quarter Tall Quarter Full Size Keg; Full Keg    
Common Use One Time Use; Portable Purposes Home Brewing Home Brewing; Dual Tap Kegerators Small Parties Small Parties; Dual Tap Kegerators Home Bar; Large Events; Business; Frat Parties    
Capacity (gal/L) 1.32 / 5 5 / 18.9 5.16 / 19.8 7.75 / 29.3 7.75 / 29.3 15.5 / 58.7 7.75 / 29.3 7.75 / 29.3
Ounces 169 640 661 992 992 1984 992 992
Cans / Bottles (12oz.) 14 53 56 82 82 165 82 82
Pints (16oz.) 10.6 40 42 62 62 124 62 62
Weight (lbs) 13 49 58 87 87 161 87 87
Height 9⅞” 23″ 23⅜” 13⅞” 23⅜” 23⅜” 13⅞” 13⅞”
Diameter 6¾” 9″ 9¼” 16⅛” 11⅛” 16⅛” 17″ 17″

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Guide to Regulating Keg Compression

This regulator adjustment guide will help you with those final steps in assuring that your kegerator provides you with the highest quality tasting beer by walking you step by step through the regulator adjustment process.

Regulator Guide
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How to Use a Hydrometer in 4 Easy Steps

Hydrometer

What is a Hydrometer?

A hydrometer is a basic tool that is used to measure the ratio of a sample liquid’s density to the density of water. In home brewing, it is a necessary tool that will show you the degree to which the yeast is converting sugar into ethanol, ultimately helping you gauge the health and success of your beer’s fermentation.

Why do I need a Hydrometer to make beer?

Homebrewing isn’t a cakewalk. There is a lot of time and effort that goes into it and there are many opportunities for things to go wrong. Perhaps the most important (and delicate) stage within beer making is fermentation. That is exactly why a hydrometer is so important, as it is the device that will tell you how the fermentation process is going. A hydrometer can be the single tool that alerts you of issues during fermentation, allowing you to make adjustments as needed.
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18 Frequently Asked Questions About Kegerators

Here at Kegerator.com, we know everything there is to know about kegerators and draft beer dispensers. Because of this we tend to receive a lot of questions from people that are interested in buying or troubleshooting their kegerator. Here are the eighteen most frequently asked questions that we receive.

Kegerator
  1. What is a kegerator?
  2. What are the different types of kegerators?
  3. What are the different types of kegs?
  4. What parts are included with a kegerator?
  5. What size keg will fit in my kegerator?
  6. What kind of coupler do I need?
  7. What do I need to tap my keg?
  8. At what temperature should I store my keg?
  9. How long does a keg stay fresh?
  10. How many kegs can I tap on one CO2 tank?
  11. Can I use my kegerator outside?
  12. How long should I wait before using my kegerator?
  13. Is a kegerator freestanding or built-in?
  14. Can a freestanding kegerator be built in?
  15. Can I build my own kegerator?
  16. How do I troubleshoot my kegerator?
  17. How do I defrost my kegerator?
  18. How do I clean my kegerator?

If you have any other questions about kegerators, please leave them in the comments down below or give our customer service department a call at 1-866-950-8710.
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Kegerator Parts List & Definitions

Kegerator Parts Guide

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From Smeg-to-Keg: How to Convert a Smeg Refrigerator into a Kegerator

Converting an old refrigerator into kegerator isn’t a new concept. But generally, when people undergo this DIY project, they choose an old and ugly fridge that has decommissioned for the dump. But, that’s not our style. And it may not be yours either. This is why we chose to convert a Smeg refrigerator into a kegerator… or as I like to call it, a “Smegerator”.

Before we get started, here’s a quick video reviewing the process. I also wrote out detailed, step-by-step instructions below.

This is how we did it.

Please note: These step-by-step instructions will loosely work with that old, ugly refrigerator you bought off of Craigslist or have sitting around in your garage.

But for this specific DIY project, however, we will be specifically referring to the Smeg refrigerator featured in this article.

The only difference that may pose a problem for you is the amount of insulation that your refrigerator has. And yes, that did cause a minor, and unexpected, headache for us.

Additionally, when you buy a refrigerator-to-kegerator conversion kit, similar instructions will be included.

Gathering Your Tools & Components

The first thing you need to do is buy a Smeg refrigerator, as well as collect all the components you need. You can go about this a couple of ways. Either order all of the pieces separately, or order our “Smegerator conversion kit.” I’d recommend the conversion kit, as everything you need is right there and you won’t have any surprises in store for you (like we did… but more on that later).
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A Beer Geek’s Guide to Beer Flights

Ever since my first introduction into the wonderful world of beer flights I’ve been hooked. In my opinion there is no better and easier way to cover a lot of tasting ground then through a beer flight or two.

At its core a beer flight is simply a sampling of several beers. This form of “taste presentation” is better known in winemaking, but is also used in the culinary industry, and is becoming prominent in craft brewing as well.

History

Reimagining an Origin

The history of beer flighting is obscured in the past and understandably vague. Wanting to sample a brewer’s fare probably became prominent along with the increased availability of different beer styles.

It’s easy to picture a discerning customer stepping into a brewpub, looking over what was available, and saying something like:   “My good man I have yet to taste of any of this finery you have listed. Be a good fellow and pour me a short draught of each that I might know which may be to my liking.”

Beer Flight Tasting

The proprietor, slightly dismayed, but savvy enough to see a new potential money maker, carefully pours four samples. “Today, my friend these are on the house. Tomorrow, it will cost… oh, as much as one ‘a me pints.”

He smiles broadly turns to the slate displaying prices and carefully chalks in a new service.

Though fictional, this account shows how easily beer flights could have come on scene, and likely did, again and again, in different places and different times. However, we can assume, safely I think, that the practice became commonplace sometime after the noun “flight” started to be used to describe it.

It’s all in a Word

It could have been called a bevy of beer, an army of ales, a leap of lagers, or a raft of brews (which would have been clever seeing as the tray a beer flight is commonly served on is called a paddle), but no, it became known as a beer “flight.” Why? A closer look at the word flight might give us some clues.

Flight, meaning a sampling of a certain food or drink, doesn’t seem to be in use before the late 1970’s. There are two distinct and separate “flight” nouns. The older of the two means “the act of flying through the air.” The newer noun which has a different origin than the first is defined as “the act of running away.” The likeliest source of the word’s use, in the context of “a sample of something,” stems from a definition of the first usage, stated in the Merriam-Webster dictionary as, “a group of similar beings or objects flying through the air together.”

It’s interesting to note that a connection could also be made, especially in the case of beer, to another definition of the same flight noun, that of, “a series, resembling a flight of stairs.” A beer flight is usually drank from lightest to darkest (we will explore this more in a moment). As you work your way “up” the color spectrum in a beer flight it isn’t hard to imagine each sample as a step, and the whole as a flight of stairs.

Beer Flights

Beer Flight Basics

The Glassware

The glasses used in beer flights can range in size from 2 ounces to 6 ounces. Personally I prefer the lower end of this range because it allows me to try more samples without worrying about getting “three sheets to the wind,” just because I wanted to try a couple beers.

The glasses themselves can be several different shapes. In my own experience beer flights are often served in an economical, single shape, such a mini-sized pint or stange. But, as beer flighting has become a more common practice the variation of glass shape has also increased. I’ve seen mini mugs, snifters, and pilsners out there. And though I’ve never seen a brewpub do it, it would truly make my day to see a beer flight served with each beer style matched to a mini version of its appropriate glass. That would be pretty cool.

The Paddle

How the samples get from the taps to you is also wide open to creativity. I’ve seen flights simply delivered on a tray and lined up on the table. I’ve seen several variations of the classic wooden paddle. At one place I was served my flight on a two inch tall round cut from a stump, with shallow holes drilled to accommodate the glasses. I’ve also seen metal wire stands where the glasses are held in wire circles either in a horizontal display or a vertical display (in this case the steps become real).

The Price

The price of a beer flight is going range a bit. It will depend on the number of samples and the price of the beer you decide to sample. In most cases though, a four beer flight of 6 oz. pours and a six beer flight of 3 oz. pours will both cost around 5 dollars. Thus, the beauty of the beer flight, taste 4 to 6 beers for close to the price of a single pint.

One Rule to Rule Them All (Almost)

The one rule usually adhered to when enjoying a beer flight is sampling the beers lightest to darkest. Generally the lightest beers have a gentler character, lower ABV, and lower hop bitterness, then the darker beers. If a dark beer is sampled before a light “quieter” beer, it is likely that much of its character will be lost behind the forward charisma of the dark one.

The only place this rule doesn’t really apply is when tasting multiples of the same style. If they happen to have a wide enough variance in ABV arrange them from lowest to highest, if not… well, use your best judgment. If there is little difference between color, ABV, or IBU’s, don’t worry…just diving in is allowed.

Beer Flight Set

Purpose: It’s all in the Flight Formation

Unfamiliar Territory

Beer flights are a great way to widen your beer knowledge or help a friend broaden a narrowly focused viewpoint. I am often disappointed when I go into a place that has great beer selection but doesn’t offer flights. If the only option I have is regular pints I usually stop around two, maybe three on the outside. On the other hand, if flights are an option, I can try anywhere from 3 to 6 (depending on glass size) times the number of beers I could otherwise.

How you make your beer selections, in this case, is completely your own. You may pick beers from the far flung ends of the spectrum. Here you are searching for styles you have not tried, be ready to for the strange and wonderful.

What Beer Am I?

This formation is all about a search for the siren singing your name. You walk into a bar not sure what beer you’re in the mood for. It’s time to hunt. Whatever strikes a chord in you- add it. This is palate music for your mood and there is no right or wrong.

Are you torn between the mellow smokey feeling of a good porter, the coffee and dark chocolate of a robust stout, the biting bitter of that IPA, or is it the crisp cleanness of a summer Lager that calls to you? Find out. Sip them all, listen to the whispers, and you’ll know which deserves the space of a full pint and more attention.

Shades of a Single Style

If you really want to educate yourself about the nuances of a beer style try this formation. First, pick your subject of study. Do you want to explore the differences between several breweries’ year-around IPA’s or are you looking for a real challenge… how about the oh-so-subtle variances between a group of light lagers. Whatever you choose it is guaranteed to be an astonishing education, one that will help you work through what you like and don’t like in a style.

Brewer’s Showcase: Horizontal Flight

Most breweries and brewpubs offer flights of the beers brewed on premise. This is a good way to learn what a local brewer offers, whether their brewing practices are up to your discerning standards, and which of their family of beers is worth a pint.

You can even explore a given Brewery on your own, either at home, or at a quality taproom. Pick a brewery you’d like to know better, select four to six of their beers and create a flight. This formation will give you inordinate insight into the different flavors the brewery offers, which beers you’d spring to buy a six pack of, and which are better left on the shelf.

A Rare Gem: Vertical Flight

This flight is unusual and hard to find outside of wine tasting. A vertical flight is sampling different vintages of the same beer. You need a special ship to go vertical, something dark, secretive; a beer with a higher “fuel” load and the needed complexity to age well. Porters and many Belgian beers come to mind here. It is a great way to experience how a beer ages and how it might change from on brewing year to the next.

Imagine being given the singular opportunity to try Alaska Brewing Company’s Smoked Porter (The most award-winning beer in Great American Beer Festival history) from its first brewing in 1988 up to the present. Now, that would be a flight worthy of a new name – hum, I wonder… maybe a Pride of Porters.

At any rate the very fact a brewery or brewpub is willing to do a vertical means it’s a beer of worthy note, and an experience you won’t soon forget.

Homeschooling your palate

Don’t think you need the hullabaloo of a bar or taphouse to fly a formation. A good way to entertain a few friends at home is by putting together an “in-house” flight plan. Here you can share notes and ideas about different beers, take as much time as you like enjoying the flavors, and actually talk without having to yell. Most of the above flights can easily be put together at home; horizontal flights, shades of a single style, or a set of completely random, but new beers.

The fantastic thing about doing this at home is the amount of control you have. You can do a little research, learn more about the beers you select, and broaden your selection criteria.

You could choose a set of beers with the same general base malt, but fermented with different yeasts, or a set of single hop IPA’s that each use a different hop variety. This flight is only limited by what you want to explore.

Homebrewers Best

This one is much the same as “homeschooling you palate.” The difference? It’s your beer! That’s right, if you happen to brew your own beer, flighting offers a great way to present your beer and impress your friends.

It’s also the best way to learn from brewing experimentation. Being able to taste a brew over several recipe changes can help you understand how each addition or subtraction is affecting the flavor profile in the finished product.


The Business Side of Flighting

From a business prospective, beer flights are definitely an added draw for customers. I’ve been to more brewpubs, bars, and restaurants that don’t offer this service then do, and in most cases the ones that didn’t, did not get as much of my business as they might have. Most taphouses are more than willing to pour you free samples until you find a beer you want to pay for. This is great, but the establishment is missing out on an opportunity and the customer is missing out on an experience.

From the glassware used, to the “paddle,” to tasting notes, insider information about the beers, even suggested food pairings; a creative and well-presented beer flight can produce a very unique experience. No place can justly ask a customer to pay for one or two tap samples, but present them as something singular and it becomes a service the customer is happy to buy.

So, go out and log some beer flight miles. You’ll get the chance to broaden your palate, learn the nuances of a single style, and entertain friends. As for me, well I’ll keep searching for my ultimate beer flight experience, that grail where styles are matched to their appropriate mini-glass.

Maybe one day….

Learn More About Beer:

Growlers 101: Why Every Beer Geek Should Own One

Over the Memorial day weekend, I was walking into a local pub I like to frequent to get my growler filled. While walking in with this big container, a group of people stopped me to ask what it was and why I had it. I was a little flabbergasted that they didn’t know what a growler was, so I gave them a quick explanation of what it was and why I was bringing it into the bar.

And then it hit me. If this group sitting at a bar doesn’t know what a growler is, then surely there’s a ton of other people out there missing out on the joys of a growler.

While a kegerator is still my preferred method of drinking draft at home, a growler is a great way to take draft beer with you on the go. Or maybe just get to try a beer without committing to an entire keg.

Let’s take a closer look at what growlers are, how to care for them and why every beer geek should own one.

What Is a Beer Growler?

Simply put, a growler is a container or vessel that is used for the transport of beer. It can also be described as an air-tight jug, typically made out of glass, ceramic or stainless steel that allows you to take draft beer from one place to another without a degradation of quality.


A Quick History of Growlers

The origin of the term “growler” is the subject of debate, and likely, the true story will never be known. But as the story goes, in the latter half of the 1800’s, growlers referred to metal pails that were used to transport beer from the local tavern to an individual’s home.

Glass Growler

There are those who believe the term arose from the sound that the pail’s cover made from the escaping carbon dioxide, while others believed the growling came from another source. The latter belief is that either the bartender or the customer would be responsible for the growling, as the bartender was supposed to fill the half-gallon container with only a pint of beer, while the customer wanted to get a pail that had much more than just a pint. Whichever party was left dissatisfied would “growl” about the issue, hence the very apt term.

There was actually a period of time in which the use of growlers was outlawed, mainly stemming from the fact that children were often sent out to pick up a pail full of beer for their father. This chain of custody issue caused alarm in many of the same types of people who worked in support of prohibition, and the alarm led many cities to outlaw the use of these containers altogether. The growler eventually regained popularity, and the present form of container is among the most widely used for transporting craft beer from its source.


Types of Growlers

Like most beer accessories, there are a few types of growlers that you should be aware of. Knowing the differences between these different types will give you a better idea of which one is right for you.

2 Liter Glass Growler

Glass:
This is easily the most popular type of growler you will see people with. You can typically buy them in both clear and amber glass. Although, I would personally recommend NOT buying a growler made out of clear glass, as the beer is likely to go bad if it sits in the sun.

One of the benefits of using a glass growler, is that you can see inside of it which helps during the filling process. The downside of glass growlers is that they will crack, chip and shatter if you handle them carelessly.

Stainless Steel Growler

Stainless Steel:
This type of growler is very popular, as they are easy to carry around and unlikely to break if you drop them. The stainless steel build will help insulate your beer, keeping it cold for you while you’re on the go.

If you are going for a hike or camping with some friends, then a stainless steel growler would be highly recommended. The downside of stainless steel, is that you can’t see inside which may make it somewhat harder to fill.

Ceramic Growler

Ceramic:
This is another popular type of growler, but not my personal favorite. Aesthetically, they look nice, but they can tend to be very heavy to carry around and somewhat difficult to clean. Because you can’t see inside of it, you may have some problems during the filling and cleaning process. Unfortunately, ceramic growlers are still susceptible to chipping or breaking if dropped or handled carelessly.


4 Benefits of Growlers

  1. Easy way to transport draft beer
    Growlers are incredibly easy to take with you. Despite the many sizes and shapes, most growlers will have a handle for you to carry it by. Even when filled with beer, they’re not too heavy. It’s easy to carry and transport multiple ones at the same time. Since they are air-tight, the beer will remain fresh even when transported.

    Instead of trying to offer a description of your new favorite beer, or having to wait until the next time you both can go to the bar or brewery, that beer can be easily transported to your friend’s home so that you all can experience it firsthand.

  2. Bring Home Beer From the Local Brewery
    This one depends on the brewery and laws of your area, but one of the best benefits of owning a growler is that you can bring home beer right from the brewery. There’s nothing quite like that first sip of a beer that you got directly from the source. But keep in mind, not every brewery will fill up a growler for you, and those that do may likely have rules they want you to follow. So make sure you call ahead and verify that they will fill it up.

  3. Share your homebrew
    As homebrewing continues its rise in popularity, those same brewers will want to share their brew with their friends and family. Obviously, bottling your homebrew is a pretty easy method to share the joy. But what if you don’t want to put in the work of bottling, and instead prefer to keg your beer? Since this is my preferred method, I’ve had to cross this bridge before.

    If I want to bring my latest brew to a friend’s house, then I have one of two choices: bottle it or fill up my growler. Because I prefer kegging, filling up one of my growlers is the easiest way for me to transport my brew without completely ruining it.

  4. Tap a New Keg
    For bartenders and party hosts alike, growlers can serve a very practical and important purpose. When the keg begins to get low, the remaining beer can be put in one or more growlers. This enables a new keg to be tapped, while also ensuring that there is beer still available.

    For a bartender, this is especially important, as there will be no gap in service and the keg can be tapped without the stress of waiting customers. For a party host, it may take more time to tap the new keg or there may not be several taps available, so having growlers on hand will ensure that beer is always available to guests.

Top of Growler
Flickr: joyride1x1

The Importance of Keeping Your Growler Clean

This should just be common sense, but you’d be surprised how many people don’t clean their growler after using it. If you fill a growler that wasn’t properly cleaned, then you won’t be able to experience the true flavors and aromas that the brewer intended.

In extreme circumstances of uncleanliness, mold and other nasty stuff may start to grow inside your growler. This is a sure bet that what you drink won’t taste right, or even be drinkable at all.

How to keep it clean:
  • Rinse it Quick:
    Directly after you pour the last of your beer, give it a rinse with hot water. If you can rinse it out pretty quickly after it’s finished, then that’s all you really have to do to get it clean and ready for the next fill.
  • Detergents & Cleansers:
    If you let the growler sit for awhile before rinsing it out, then you’ll want to use some sort of cleanser to help get it clean. If you do this, it is wise to not use a fat or oil-based soap. These will make it harder to completely rinse out, possibly leaving residuals behind that will, ultimately, ruin your next fill. If you have any homebrew cleansers sitting around your house, then I would recommend using those.
  • Consider Using a Brush:
    If it’s really nasty inside, then it may be best for you to use a brush to give it a good scrub. A carboy brush or baby-bottle brush will do the trick. However, it is not recommended that you use a brush with metal wires to clean a glass or ceramic growler, as it may damage the container.
  • Let it Air-Dry:
    Now that you’ve cleaned out the inside, it’s best to just let it air dry. I will turn mine upside down and lean it against the wall at an angle to help expedite this process. If you try to dry the inside with a towel, then you will likely leave tiny fibers behind, which will affect the overall quality of your next fill. It would also be a giant pain to try to hand-dry the inside of a growler. So, pack some patience and let it dry on its own.

Depending on where you take it get filled, they should offer to sanitize it for you. If so, take them up on it. Even if you just got done cleaning it out, this extra sanitization will help ensure that you get the best tasting beer. Unfortunately, not all places will offer this to you, so it’s still wise to make sure your growler is clean and ready before you even leave your house. If you do find a place that offers it, then you should continue going back to them, as they clearly know how to handle a growler.


How to Fill Your Growler

Now that your growler is clean, you may be wondering what now? First you’ll need to find a place that fills them. Unfortunately, not every bar that serves draft beer will be willing to fill your growler. A simple internet search should give you a good idea of what establishments around you will fill it for you. I’ve also found that places that have a great selection of craft beer on tap will sometimes fill a growler, even if they don’t advertise it to the general public. Just ask the bartender at your favorite watering hole and see what their policy is. You may be surprised at how many places will do it.

Once you find a place that fills them, just bring in your growler, tell them what you’d like and then closely monitor how they fill it.

Filling Methods

Filling your growler is more than just opening the cap and filling it up from the beer faucet. There’s a couple of ways you may notice your growler being filled.

  • Bottom-Up Filling:
    This is the more traditional method of filling a growler, and what you will see the most. The bartender will attach an extension tube to the faucet. This tube is then inserted into the growler and fills it from the bottom up, much like you would do when bottling your own homebrew. This method will lessen the overall amount of spillage and the filling time. Unfortunately, using a bottom-up filling tube may also increase the amount of oxygen inside your growler, leading it to go stale quicker than it should.
  • Counter Pressure CO2 Filling:
    Another method that may notice, is the use a counter pressure CO2 filler to help lessen the amount of oxygen. This system works by purging the oxygen out of the growler before it is filled. This helps prevent your beer from becoming oxidized, which will give you a little more time to drink it before it becomes stale.
  • Pouring it From the Tap:
    This method of filling up your growler consists of putting the growler up to the beer faucet, and simply pouring the beer into the growler. As you could imagine, this is going to create a bunch of foam head, possibly leading to a lot of wasted beer and a big mess to clean up. Not to mention the degradation of the beer contained within the growler in the end. This is not a recommended method of filling up a growler, and should only be used as a last resort.

Safety Concerns

As fun as growlers can be, there are some safety issues that you need to be aware of. Mainly, an over-filled or over-pressurized growler does pose a risk of exploding in extreme circumstances, including both hot and cold temperatures. If you leave it in a hot car or forget about it in the freezer, then it’s likely that the growler will crack, shatter or explode as a result.

Safety Tips:
  • Keep it at a Desirable Temperature:
    First and foremost, treat your growler like you would treat a bottle or can of beer. Keep it cold in the fridge, and do your best to avoid extremely hot or cold temperatures.
  • Do Not Overfill:
    You may be tempted to squeeze every single drop into the growler before sealing it. However, it’s recommended that you leave some space at the very top for the foam head. Most growlers will have a fill line etched into the side. If so, then it’s easy to know where to stop filling.
  • Inspect Before You Fill:
    As tedious as it may seem, before you take in your growler to be filled, it would be wise for you to look it over for any possible chips, cracks or dents on the container. Once filled, these may lead to further damage of your growler and/or the degradation of the beer inside.

Local & State Regulations

Depending on where you live, and the local laws of your area, you may have some trouble filling up a growler. Some states allow you to fill a growler directly from the brewery, while others don’t. Some states require your growler to be labeled with identifying information, including brewery name, net contents, production details and a government warning.

Some breweries and retailers are required to “exchange” your empty growler for one of their sanitized, but full, growlers that they cleaned in-house. While inconvenient, it’s considered a safety issue

Every state is different and has different requirements. The Brewers Association is a great resource to find out what the regulations are in your area. So, before you buy a growler, it would be wise to know what they will and won’t do in your area.

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Introducing EdgeStar’s Full Size Built-In Kegerator KC7000 Series

EdgeStar has long established themselves as an authority in dispensing draft beer. This knowledge and experience has culminated in their latest development — a new series of top-of-the-line full size, forced-air refrigerated, built-in, stainless steel kegerators.

Let’s explore the KC7000 line-up and revel in the glory of residential kegerator perfection.
KC7000 Kegerator Series

Over a decade of draft beer experience poured into this state-of-the-art kegerator.

The Difference Makers:

Despite its sleek appearance, the thoughtful design and ample conveniences provided by this series of kegerators are what elevates them.

1. Durable & Spacious

Able to be built-in flush-with-cabinetry, these stainless steel kegerators look fantastic amongst any décor. Their immense cabinets can fit a keg of ANY size, even those rubberized and beveled edge kegs that typically have a hard time fitting in other kegerators. Also, you won’t have to baby this kegerator. The floors of the refrigerator boxes are reinforced with durable stainless steel, so constant loading, unloading, and situating kegs will do little to no damage to the unit. You can go ahead and be rough with it, the KC7000 can take it.

2. Three Words: Ice. Cold. Beer.

These units use forced air refrigeration rather than cold plates. Because of this, cold air is able to reach every nook within the kegerator, eliminating those worrisome hot spots and areas of uneven temperatures. The temperature itself is adjustable from 32-60°F, allowing you to keep your beer ice cold or stout-worthy cool. You can set and monitor your settings using the push button control panel with easy-to-read digital display.

3. Eliminate the Foamy Pour

Speaking of coldness, one major feature that sets this series apart from all others is the air-cooled beer tower. When beer sits in the draft tower between pours, it typically begins to warm up and may cause your next pour to be full of foam. Think of all the beer you’ve lost to this irksome foamy pour. With an air-cooled tower, this is not the case. Your beer stays cold and fresh from the keg to the glass. You won’t waste a drop and still pour the perfect beer.

4. All Inclusive

No need to go scouring the internet for parts, everything you’ll need (excluding a keg of beer, of course) arrives with your kegerator. We’re talking about quality components, too. NSF-approved lines, 304 grade stainless steel faucets, and dual gauge regulators are just a sample of the top-of-the-line parts you’ll receive. Other conveniences provided are a stainless steel drip tray, guard rail, and heavy-duty mobility casters.

5. Thoughtful Details

Other conveniences to look out for on these kegerators are the safety lock, interior lighting, and reversible door. If you’ve taken the time to find the perfect temperature and precise regulator settings, the last thing you want is for someone to go in and mettle with your specifications. The safety lock prevents this from happening. Additionally, optional interior lighting makes finding those perfect settings that much easier. A reversible door comes in handy if you are left-handed or want your unit to follow the flow of your cabinetry.

Meet The KC7000 Line-Up

Indoor Units:

The EdgeStar Full Size Built-In Kegerators (KC7000SS, KC7000SSTWIN, KC7000SSTRIP) have all of the bells and whistles without any of the fuss. They are available in single, dual, and triple tap configurations and are designed for indoor residential freestanding or built-in applications. If you’re looking to be the envy of all your friends, install one of these bad boys in your man cave or home bar. Your daily beer drinking and entertaining will never be the same again.

KC7000SS KC7000SSTWIN KC7000SSTRIP
Edgestar Full-Size Kegerator (KC7000SS) EdgeStar Full-Size Dual-Tap Kegerator (KC7000SSTWIN) EdgeStar Full-Size Triple-Tap Kegerator (KC7000SSTRIP)

Outdoor Units:

The EdgeStar Full Size Built-In Outdoor Kegerators (KC7000SSOD, KC7000SSODTWIN, KC7000SSODTRIP) are everything amazing about the indoor models, only they’re approved for outdoor use as well. Also available in single, dual, and triple tap configurations, these units are fully wrapped in stainless steel and ready to take on any weather. Looking to kick it up a notch in that outdoor kitchen of yours? Look no further than these outdoor models. Entertaining outside and enjoying your patio, pool, or backyard will be enhanced two-fold.

KC7000SSOD KC7000SSODTWIN KC7000SSODTRIP
Edgestar Full-Size Outdoor Kegerator (KC7000SSOD) EdgeStar Full-Size Dual-Tap Outdoor Kegerator (KC7000SSODTWIN) EdgeStar Full-Size Triple-Tap Outdoor Kegerator (KC7000SSODTRIP)

Build a Custom Kegerator:

If you’ve got a custom-build in mind but are looking for a quality fridge to start with, consider using the full size conversion refrigerators available in this series. With all of the features available in the complete kegerators of this series and also available in both indoor (BR7000SS) and outdoor (BR7000SSOD) models, these refrigerators are the perfect starter kit to building your dream kegerator. All you’ll need is to seek out is your ideal dispensing components.

If you’re a draft beer connoisseur looking for a way to dispense your favorite brews in your indoor/outdoor kitchen, patio, man cave, or home bar, consider EdgeStar’s KC7000 Series. Choosing a unit from the KC7000 line will undoubtedly transform the way you drink and entertain.

Recommended Reading:

How to Choose Your Dream Home Kegerator

Lost on the interweb looking for that perfect kegerator for your home? With so many similar looking models to choose from, shopping for one can seem quite overwhelming. There are many options to consider when looking for a kegerator. For example, is it going to be built-in or freestanding? Is it going to be installed indoors or outdoors? How many kegs did you want to dispense at a time?

Edgestar KC7000SS

Once you’ve determined your application, you can quickly narrow down your options and begin to consider the more technical aspects of dispensing beer. Two technical factors that affect how well beer pours are temperature and pressure. When the temperature and pressure are set at optimal levels, a perfect pour can be achieved.

While it may seem logical that a foamy pour would be caused by too much pressure, it is actually temperature that contributes most to the level of foam in the beer. Foam naturally occurs when the temperature of the beer is 38 degrees or warmer. When beer reaches that temperature it releases CO2, which becomes foam in the beer.

A higher temperature can also cause beer to become cloudy and sour. However, it isn’t just warm temperatures that cause beer to foam. Foam can also form when the beer is too cold. If the temperature reaches 29 degrees, beer can start to freeze, and the small amount of liquid that remains unfrozen will turn to foam as it travels through the lines and out the tap.
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