Troubleshooting Your Kegerator

If you are experiencing problems with your kegerator, please refer to our troubleshooting guide below. If your problem is not found below or you are unable to correct an issue you find on the chart, please leave a comment and/or give us a call at 1-866-950-8710.

Issue Possible Cause Solution
Cloudy Beer:
Beer is hazy and not clear
Temperature too low Increase the temperature of the refrigerator to 36°F or higher.
Faucet partially opened Turn the tap off, then open it quickly and fully.
Keg has something warm on it Remove any item that is not cold from the keg.
Flat Beer:
Head comes out like large soap bubbles and disappears quickly. Beer tastes less fresh
Greasy glasses (grease can come from fried foods, lipstick, or dirty hands) Wash glasses thoroughly after use and allow to air dry. Do not dry wipe. Cold rinse glasses before pouring beer. Designate beer-only glasses.
Poor pour Be careful about the distance of the faucet to the glass. A perfect pour will give you about a 1/2″ to 1″ thick tight head on top.
Low pressure Check if the CO2 tank is on and is not empty. Check for obstructions in the air lines. If the PSI is too low, raise it a little bit at a time. (Be careful as the regulator is very sensitive). Regulators need to be replaced every 4-6 years after wear.
Bad or Off-Tasting Beer:
Beer is bitter and has an unpleasant bite.
Dirty beer line or faucet Clean the faucet and lines after you finish off every keg.
Dirty air line Replace the air line if it looks to be contaminated. Otherwise, clean it like you would the beer line and rinse it clean.
Old beer Toss the keg, and get a new one.
Foamy Beer:
You pour and it comes out all foam and no beer.
Warm Beer Regulate the refrigerator’s temperature to be at 38-42° Fahrenheit
Excessive CO2 Lower the CO2 pressure going into the keg. Turn off the CO2tank, pull the relief valve for about 3 seconds, wait about 15 minutes before turning it back on.
Old beer lines Replace your beer lines.
Clogged faucet Remove the faucet, soak in hot water and clean with a brush every few weeks.
Poor pour Be careful about the distance of the faucet to the glass. A perfect pour will give you about a 1/2″ to 1″ thick tight head on top.
Worn down parts in faucet Check for worn washers and replace as needed. Check the faucet to make sure it opens fully. Replace the faucet or it’s parts as needed.
Warm beer lines The full length of beer tubing needs to be refrigerated. Beer lines longer than 6 feet may cause issues as well.

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Step-by-Step: Kegerator Assembly Guide

This is a general reference guide for assembling and installing a standard full size kegerator. Depending on the kegerator brand, make, and model, slight modifications may be needed in the assembly and installation.

For a visual reference of parts that are numbered in parentheses in this installation guide, please view the kegerator diagram below.

Listed Parts:
  1. Faucet Handle
  2. Faucet
  3. Beer Tower
  4. Guard Rail
  5. Drip Tray
  6. Regulator
  7. CO2 Tube
  8. CO2 Cylinder
  9. CO2 Holder
  10. Keg Coupler
  11. Metal Keg Floor Support
  12. Caster Washer (x2)
  13. Casters (x4)
  14. Neoprene Washer
  15. Snap-On Clamps (x2)
  16. Wire Shelves (not pictured) (x2)
  17. Half Barrel Keg (not included)
  18. Faucet Wrench (not pictured)

Kegerator Parts Guide
For a more in-depth review of what each component is, please refer to our Kegerator Parts article.


Step-by-Step Instructions for Assembling Your Kegerator

Follow these step-by-step instructions for assembling your kegerator and installing/tapping a keg inside of it.

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Guide to Regulating Keg Compression

This regulator adjustment guide will help you with those final steps in assuring that your kegerator provides you with the highest quality tasting beer by walking you step by step through the regulator adjustment process.

Regulator Guide
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18 Frequently Asked Questions About Kegerators

Here at Kegerator.com, we know everything there is to know about kegerators and draft beer dispensers. Because of this we tend to receive a lot of questions from people that are interested in buying or troubleshooting their kegerator. Here are the eighteen most frequently asked questions that we receive.

Kegerator
  1. What is a kegerator?
  2. What are the different types of kegerators?
  3. What are the different types of kegs?
  4. What parts are included with a kegerator?
  5. What size keg will fit in my kegerator?
  6. What kind of coupler do I need?
  7. What do I need to tap my keg?
  8. At what temperature should I store my keg?
  9. How long does a keg stay fresh?
  10. How many kegs can I tap on one CO2 tank?
  11. Can I use my kegerator outside?
  12. How long should I wait before using my kegerator?
  13. Is a kegerator freestanding or built-in?
  14. Can a freestanding kegerator be built in?
  15. Can I build my own kegerator?
  16. How do I troubleshoot my kegerator?
  17. How do I defrost my kegerator?
  18. How do I clean my kegerator?

If you have any other questions about kegerators, please leave them in the comments down below or give our customer service department a call at 1-866-950-8710.
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Kegerator Parts List & Definitions

Kegerator Parts Guide

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The Importance of Cleaning Your Draft Beer Components

Cleaning your draft components is crucial. Failure to do so can lead to buildups of yeast, mold, and beer deposits in your lines and ultimately result in funky tasting beer. Although your first cleaning may seem tedious, it gets easier. As long as you know what to clean and what tools to use to clean it, equipment cleaning will become a quick and easy routine you hardly think twice about.

What Components Do I Need to Clean?

  • Faucet(s)
  • Keg Coupler(s)
  • Beer Line(s)

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The Different Types of Beer Faucets Explained

The function of a faucet in dispensing beer is so crucial, yet its importance is so often completely overlooked. You may think a beer faucet is obviously a faucet and that’s all there is to it, but you couldn’t be more wrong.

Types of Beer Faucets

The intended function, design, shape, and materials used are all important factors to consider when looking at faucets. Forget what you think you know and get ready to be instilled with a deeper appreciation for the role that beer faucets play in dispensing your favorite beverage.

What is a Beer Faucet?

A beer faucet is the last component your beer touches before it hits your glass. Like all faucets, it’s meant to direct the flow of your brew and help ensure that perfect pour we all strive for.

Faucets are also what the tap handle connects to. Often mistaken as the same component, tap handles are merely the lever in which you pull to both commence and suspend the flow of beer to the faucet. They are also used, especially in commercial environments, to identify what type of beer that will be served from that specific faucet.
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The Different Types of Beer Regulators Explained

Whether you’ve been considering taking the plunge into the world of draft beer with your own personal kegerator or you’ve been serving beer on tap for years, you may have some questions about regulators. I know I did after I got my first kegerator.

CO2 Tank & Regulator Inside a Kegerator
CO2 Tank & Regulator Inside a Kegerator

Finding the perfect CO2 or Nitrogen pressure is, perhaps, the most tedious part of dispensing draft beer. Regulators help to perfect and ease this cumbersome task.

So, kick back, pour yourself a beer and get ready to learn the differences between the many different types of beer regulators.

What is a Regulator?

A regulator is the device that connects the gas cylinder to the air tube. As one of the most important components of a kegerator, the regulator controls the flow of CO2 or Nitrogen from the cylinder through the line. If the pressure needs adjusting, the regulator is where you would make those adjustments to find the right pressure.
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Kegerator Glossary: Terms You Should Know

The world of draft beer has its own language, or so it may seem if you don’t recognize the terms being used. You may find yourself asking, They want me to connect what to the what? Whether you’re reading assembly instructions or browsing product descriptions, here are all the kegerator terms you need to know:

Keg Shell

Acid Cleaner — Removes beer and water stones from the beer lines. Not all acid cleaners are safe to use on all components, so these should only be used on your lines.

Barrier Tubing — Tubing lined with nylon or PET in order to better protect from the oxidation of your beer.

Beer Pump — A device that uses compressed air or CO2 to move beer great distances. Used when the faucet is far away from the keg.

Cleaning Pot — Also called a cleaning can. A vessel used to clean dispensing components. Once filled with cleaning solution, it is then tapped in the same fashion as a keg and dispensed through the draft system.

CO2 — In direct draw systems where the faucet is near the keg, carbon dioxide is used to push the beer from the keg.

CO2 Cylinder — Also called a CO2 tank, it’s the vessel that houses the CO2 gas mixture. Many kegerators arrive with a cylinder, but they are empty and need to be filled.

Conversion Kit — This kit contains everything you need to convert a refrigerator into a kegerator. There are different kinds of conversion kits, but they all typically include a faucet, beer line, air tube, coupler, draft tower, regulator, CO2 cylinder, and spanner wrench.
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The Ins & Outs of a Kegerator

Beer is best when served fresh, cold, and on draft. Half the cost of canned and bottled of beer, kegged beer is a cost-efficient way to enjoy your favorite beverage. A kegerator makes this enjoyment possible, and depending on your beer buying frequency, can paying for itself in just a matter of months. It’s kegonomics, really.

Kegerator Anatomy

Let’s take a closer look at the ins and outs of this aptly named beer dispenser.

Components & Tools Used in Assembly

If you purchase a complete kegerator, all components and tools necessary for assembly will be provided for you.

However, if you’re building your own custom kegerator, you’ll need to be sure you have the following components and tools:
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