Keg Size Comparison Chart

Comparing Keg Sizes & Types:

Here’s a chart that compares eight common types of kegs, including how much beer they hold, their overall size and most common uses for each.

  Capacity
(gal / oz)
Cans / Bottles
(12oz)
Pints
(16oz)
Height / Weight Width
(Diameter)
Mini Keg 1.32 / 169 14 10.6 9⅞” / 13lbs. 6¾”
Cornelius Keg 5.0 / 640 53 40 23″ / 49lbs. 9″
Sixth Barrel 5.16 / 661 56 42 23⅜” / 58lbs. 9¼”
Quarter Barrel 7.75 / 992 82 62 13⅞” / 87lbs. 16⅛”
Slim Quarter 7.75 / 992 82 62 23⅜” / 87lbs. 11⅛”
Half Barrel 15.5 / 1984 165 124 23⅜” / 161lbs. 16⅛”
Rubber Barrel 7.75 / 992 82 62 13⅞” / 87lbs. 17″
Beveled Barrel 7.75 / 992 82 62 13⅞” / 87lbs. 17″

Keg Sizes Detailed:

While the comparison chart above gives you a quick way to compare different sizes of kegs against others, below we have gone into more detail on each type of keg.

Mini Keg

Mini Keg:

Designed for mini kegerators, this size keg only holds 5 liters of beer, or 169.07 ounces to be exact. This is the perfect sized keg for one-time use and/or portable purposes. This may include watching the game with a couple of friends, weekend camping trip or a small dinner party with family.

  • Nicknames:  Bubba Keg
  • Common Uses:  One-time Use, Portable Applications
  • Dimensions:  9⅞” x 6¾”

Cornelius Keg

Cornelius Keg:

Commonly used by homebrewers as an alternative to bottling their beer, Cornelius kegs hails to us from the soft drink industry. While Pepsi and Coca-Cola both have uses for them, they have grown in popularity by those that brew their own beer or soda from home. They are easy to fill up and clean. There are two types of connectors that are available for the Cornelius keg, including ball-lock and pin-lock. Both have different connectors that you would need to become familiar with.

  • Nicknames:  Corny Keg, Homebrew Keg, Soda Keg
  • Common Uses:  Home Brewing
  • Dimensions:  23″ x 9″

Cornelius Keg

Sixth Barrel Keg:

Commonly used for personal use in dual or triple-tap kegerators, the sixth barrel is roughly the same size as the Corny Keg, just slightly larger. This keg functions just like their larger counterparts with just a smaller capacity.

This size keg is also a great choice for restaurants and/or bars that have little space, but want to have a large variety of beer available for customers.

  • Nicknames:  Sixtel, Torpedo, Log
  • Common Uses:  Dual-Tap Kegerators, Home Brewing, Individual Use
  • Dimensions:  23⅜” x 9¼”

Quarter Keg

Quarter Barrel Keg:

Short and stubby in size, the Quarter barrel keg is the same width (16⅛”) as a full barrel, yet much shorter in terms of height. Commonly called a “Pony Keg” or a “Stubby Keg,” this keg will hold the equivalent of sixty-two pints.

  • Nicknames:  Pony Keg, Stubby Quarter
  • Common Uses:  Small Parties
  • Dimensions:  16⅛” x 13⅞”

Slim Quarter Keg

Slim Quarter Keg:

The Slim Quarter holds the same amount of beer as the aforementioned Quarter barrel, however, the over shape and size resembles the sixth barrel keg. With a tall and skinny build, the Slim Quarter is the same height as the Sixth barrel, but has a larger width. This extra width allows it to hold an extra two gallons, which equals an extra 27.5 bottles of beer.

  • Nicknames:  Tall Quarter, The Slim
  • Common Uses:  Dual-Tap Kegerators; Small Parties
  • Dimensions:  11⅛” x 23⅜”

Half Barrel Keg

Half Barrel Keg:

When you think of your average beer keg, the Half barrel size is probably what comes into your mind. Undoubtedly, you’ve probably seen this size keg at a party or large event. This full size keg is the largest that is available to you, and what is commonly used in bars and restaurants across the world. Most home kegerators will fit this size keg, however, the smaller versions are typically more popular amongst beer drinkers.

  • Nicknames:  Full Size Keg, Barrel of Beer, Full Keg
  • Common Uses:  Home Bar, Large Events, Business, Frat Parties
  • Dimensions:  16⅛” x 23⅜”

Do you have any questions about the shape or size of kegs? If so, please leave them in the comments section down below or give us a call at 1-800-297-6076.

More Kegerator Info:

Featured Image: Photo Credit

Homebrew Kits: How to Choose the Right Kit for You

Having the right equipment is crucial to a successful home brewing. Rather than attempting to search for all of the necessary components individually, choosing to get a comprehensive Equipment Kit is the best place to start. That way, you know you’ll have everything you need right there and won’t be scrambling for parts come brew time.

We’ve put together an assortment of equipment kits that range from basic to complete, all created with the needs of all types of homebrewers in mind. We’ll take you through each package to help you decide which equipment kit is the perfect one for both your brewing style and your wallet.

[Read more...]

Troubleshooting Your Kegerator

If you are experiencing problems with your kegerator, please refer to our troubleshooting guide below. If your problem is not found below or you are unable to correct an issue you find on the chart, please leave a comment and/or give us a call at 1-866-950-8710.

Issue Possible Cause Solution
Cloudy Beer:
Beer is hazy and not clear
Temperature too low Increase the temperature of the refrigerator to 36°F or higher.
Faucet partially opened Turn the tap off, then open it quickly and fully.
Keg has something warm on it Remove any item that is not cold from the keg.
Flat Beer:
Head comes out like large soap bubbles and disappears quickly. Beer tastes less fresh
Greasy glasses (grease can come from fried foods, lipstick, or dirty hands) Wash glasses thoroughly after use and allow to air dry. Do not dry wipe. Cold rinse glasses before pouring beer. Designate beer-only glasses.
Poor pour Be careful about the distance of the faucet to the glass. A perfect pour will give you about a 1/2″ to 1″ thick tight head on top.
Low pressure Check if the CO2 tank is on and is not empty. Check for obstructions in the air lines. If the PSI is too low, raise it a little bit at a time. (Be careful as the regulator is very sensitive). Regulators need to be replaced every 4-6 years after wear.
Bad or Off-Tasting Beer:
Beer is bitter and has an unpleasant bite.
Dirty beer line or faucet Clean the faucet and lines after you finish off every keg.
Dirty air line Replace the air line if it looks to be contaminated. Otherwise, clean it like you would the beer line and rinse it clean.
Old beer Toss the keg, and get a new one.
Foamy Beer:
You pour and it comes out all foam and no beer.
Warm Beer Regulate the refrigerator’s temperature to be at 38-42° Fahrenheit
Excessive CO2 Lower the CO2 pressure going into the keg. Turn off the CO2tank, pull the relief valve for about 3 seconds, wait about 15 minutes before turning it back on.
Old beer lines Replace your beer lines.
Clogged faucet Remove the faucet, soak in hot water and clean with a brush every few weeks.
Poor pour Be careful about the distance of the faucet to the glass. A perfect pour will give you about a 1/2″ to 1″ thick tight head on top.
Worn down parts in faucet Check for worn washers and replace as needed. Check the faucet to make sure it opens fully. Replace the faucet or it’s parts as needed.
Warm beer lines The full length of beer tubing needs to be refrigerated. Beer lines longer than 6 feet may cause issues as well.

[Read more...]

How to Brew Beer

Home brewing beer has been said to be part science and part art. There is a precise and calculated aspect to the process but at the same time the “rules” and any possible confines can be hazy, presenting grounds for personal interpretation and the creation of a truly unique beer. Sounds like it could be difficult, right? Well, it’s not.

Brewing beer really comes down to a simple process that has roots as far back as 12,000 years. You essentially heat water and grain (and/or extract from grain), boil the mixture with hops, cool the mixture, ferment the mixture using yeast and then carbonate. Easy enough, right? Well, now we’ll go into a little bit more depth within each step.

The Main Steps of Homebrewing:

  1. Cleaning and Sanitizing
  2. The Brew
  3. After the Brew
  4. Fermentation
  5. Bottling and Kegging

[Read more...]

Step-by-Step: Kegerator Assembly Guide

This is a general reference guide for assembling and installing a standard full size kegerator. Depending on the kegerator brand, make, and model, slight modifications may be needed in the assembly and installation.

For a visual reference of parts that are numbered in parentheses in this installation guide, please view the kegerator diagram below.

Listed Parts:
  1. Faucet Handle
  2. Faucet
  3. Beer Tower
  4. Guard Rail
  5. Drip Tray
  6. Regulator
  7. CO2 Tube
  8. CO2 Cylinder
  9. CO2 Holder
  10. Keg Coupler
  11. Metal Keg Floor Support
  12. Caster Washer (x2)
  13. Casters (x4)
  14. Neoprene Washer
  15. Snap-On Clamps (x2)
  16. Wire Shelves (not pictured) (x2)
  17. Half Barrel Keg (not included)
  18. Faucet Wrench (not pictured)

Kegerator Parts Guide
For a more in-depth review of what each component is, please refer to our Kegerator Parts article.


Step-by-Step Instructions for Assembling Your Kegerator

Follow these step-by-step instructions for assembling your kegerator and installing/tapping a keg inside of it.

[Read more...]

Guide to Regulating Keg Compression

This regulator adjustment guide will help you with those final steps in assuring that your kegerator provides you with the highest quality tasting beer by walking you step by step through the regulator adjustment process.

Regulator Guide
[Read more...]

How to Use a Hydrometer in 4 Easy Steps

Hydrometer

What is a Hydrometer?

A hydrometer is a basic tool that is used to measure the ratio of a sample liquid’s density to the density of water. In home brewing, it is a necessary tool that will show you the degree to which the yeast is converting sugar into ethanol, ultimately helping you gauge the health and success of your beer’s fermentation.

Why do I need a Hydrometer to make beer?

Homebrewing isn’t a cakewalk. There is a lot of time and effort that goes into it and there are many opportunities for things to go wrong. Perhaps the most important (and delicate) stage within beer making is fermentation. That is exactly why a hydrometer is so important, as it is the device that will tell you how the fermentation process is going. A hydrometer can be the single tool that alerts you of issues during fermentation, allowing you to make adjustments as needed.
[Read more...]

8 Helpful Homebrew Components You Should Consider Buying

So you have your homebrew equipment kit and you’re ready to make some delicious beer. Or so you think. Though equipment kits come with everything necessary to get you through your first few brews, after becoming more familiar with the process, you may want to consider grabbing a few extra components that can help make the process even easier.

1. Improved Temperature Monitoring

Bi-Metal Thermometer

Maintaining proper temperatures throughout the brewing process is critical. If your wort gets too hot or is not hot enough the entire batch can be ruined, and unfortunately, you wouldn’t know it until it was too late.

We recommend getting a trust-worthy brewing thermometer, such as a Bi-Metal Thermometer. This thermometer is able to give you faster readings than your average mercury or silver-based device, which is particularly helpful during the brewing and cooling stages.
[Read more...]

18 Frequently Asked Questions About Kegerators

Here at Kegerator.com, we know everything there is to know about kegerators and draft beer dispensers. Because of this we tend to receive a lot of questions from people that are interested in buying or troubleshooting their kegerator. Here are the eighteen most frequently asked questions that we receive.

Kegerator
  1. What is a kegerator?
  2. What are the different types of kegerators?
  3. What are the different types of kegs?
  4. What parts are included with a kegerator?
  5. What size keg will fit in my kegerator?
  6. What kind of coupler do I need?
  7. What do I need to tap my keg?
  8. At what temperature should I store my keg?
  9. How long does a keg stay fresh?
  10. How many kegs can I tap on one CO2 tank?
  11. Can I use my kegerator outside?
  12. How long should I wait before using my kegerator?
  13. Is a kegerator freestanding or built-in?
  14. Can a freestanding kegerator be built in?
  15. Can I build my own kegerator?
  16. How do I troubleshoot my kegerator?
  17. How do I defrost my kegerator?
  18. How do I clean my kegerator?

If you have any other questions about kegerators, please leave them in the comments down below or give our customer service department a call at 1-866-950-8710.
[Read more...]

The Importance of Cleaning Your Draft Beer Components

Cleaning your draft components is crucial. Failure to do so can lead to buildups of yeast, mold, and beer deposits in your lines and ultimately result in funky tasting beer. Although your first cleaning may seem tedious, it gets easier. As long as you know what to clean and what tools to use to clean it, equipment cleaning will become a quick and easy routine you hardly think twice about.

What Components Do I Need to Clean?

  • Faucet(s)
  • Keg Coupler(s)
  • Beer Line(s)

[Read more...]